Business Delivery

Experts Share Good ol’ Days of 35mm Slides

Join Jim Endicott of Distinction Communications and Patty Clerico-Parham of Cisco as they share what the glory days were like before PowerPoint. These pros used to make slides by hand with equipment the size of refrigerators.

In case you’re too young to know what a 35mm slide is, here’s a scene from Mad Men where they are pitching an advertising concept to Kodak for a 35mm slide Carousel.

Listen to the interview

Topics

  • Tektronix for typesetting
  • DICOMED System
  • Patty talks about a time of 8-inch disks and Dark Rooms
  • $10-15 to manufacture a single slide
  • Genigraphics Consoles that cost $50,000 each
  • Building presentations in DOS with the command line
  • IBM Slides from 1975
  • Slideless presentations are dynamic, refreshing, human, genuine, trustworthy
  • Jim talks about sleeping bag overnighters for 30 slide prezos
  • Creating gradient the old-fashioned way
  • When computers were as big as desks
  • Back when PowerPoint was B&W
  • Persuasion vs. PowerPoint
  • Supply and demand for design
  • 35 years later, have we progressed 35 years worth?
  • Misuse of technology hurts message
  • Everyone’s a “designer”, but can everyone design?
  • Demand for marriage of communication skills and design skills

 

Nancy Duarte

AUTHOR |

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  • Very cool. The last place I worked used the term foils as well. When they found out I was going to a company to work on slides, they began calling me “foil boy.” Thanks, Patty, Jim and Nancy for sharing your stories.

  • Very cool. The last place I worked used the term foils as well. When they found out I was going to a company to work on slides, they began calling me “foil boy.” Thanks, Patty, Jim and Nancy for sharing your stories.

  • And don’t forget all of the hassles that came out of dealing with slides as physical objects rather than electronic files. A recent reminiscence:

    “For instance, we were still using 35mm slides. They needed to be in fragile glass mounts (plastic mounts tend to warp and jam the projector) and hand numbered with a sharpie. There was no putting a quick backup copy of your slide files on a thumb drive and tossing it into a your bag. You needed to hand-carry two complete sets of slides to the meeting, preferably using different people on different flights.”

    (http://www.breakingmurphyslaw.com/2008/10/09/but-i-cant-find-a-pepsi-anywhere/)

  • And don’t forget all of the hassles that came out of dealing with slides as physical objects rather than electronic files. A recent reminiscence:

    “For instance, we were still using 35mm slides. They needed to be in fragile glass mounts (plastic mounts tend to warp and jam the projector) and hand numbered with a sharpie. There was no putting a quick backup copy of your slide files on a thumb drive and tossing it into a your bag. You needed to hand-carry two complete sets of slides to the meeting, preferably using different people on different flights.”

    (http://www.breakingmurphyslaw.com/2008/10/09/but-i-cant-find-a-pepsi-anywhere/)

  • That scene from Mad Men is probably one of my favorite scenes ever.

  • That scene from Mad Men is probably one of my favorite scenes ever.

  • Hey Lee,
    Great link and 35MM memories! Those were the days!
    Nancy

  • Hey Lee,
    Great link and 35MM memories! Those were the days!
    Nancy

  • Christian

    The IBM slides were really impressive. Really liked the way they worked the fonts.

  • Christian

    The IBM slides were really impressive. Really liked the way they worked the fonts.

  • Nice topics, bringing memories back to daylight but, why starting with “HiTech”?
    What about those days, preparing slides by hand, making artworks with x-actos, glue, “edding” artmarkers, pasted photos, illustrations, titles with instant-lettering, drawing graphs with pencils or rotrings and colorizing them with auto-adhesive film, using x-actos, cutting your fingers and finnaly bringing all the artworks to a photographer to put them into 35mm slides… while you tried to get rid of all those hundreds of adhesive-film micro leftovers, from your hands, clothes, etc.?
    Or… damn… is it me just getting too old??? LOL

  • Nice topics, bringing memories back to daylight but, why starting with “HiTech”?
    What about those days, preparing slides by hand, making artworks with x-actos, glue, “edding” artmarkers, pasted photos, illustrations, titles with instant-lettering, drawing graphs with pencils or rotrings and colorizing them with auto-adhesive film, using x-actos, cutting your fingers and finnaly bringing all the artworks to a photographer to put them into 35mm slides… while you tried to get rid of all those hundreds of adhesive-film micro leftovers, from your hands, clothes, etc.?
    Or… damn… is it me just getting too old??? LOL

  • Great stuff! In fact, so inspired was I that I wrote about my ‘ancient days’ as a presenter. I couldn’t afford slides so I went with overheads prepared on my DeskJet 550C. You can read about it here:
    Rikk’s First and Last Presentation

  • Great stuff! In fact, so inspired was I that I wrote about my ‘ancient days’ as a presenter. I couldn’t afford slides so I went with overheads prepared on my DeskJet 550C. You can read about it here:
    Rikk’s First and Last Presentation

  • Genie Padrick

    I would like to know where I can buy 35mm Kodak ready-mounts. I have a lot of film I would like to put into slides. Any ideas?

    • Future Quest Technologies

      please let me know if you still need these – I have a box of 100
      flat and UNSEALED 2X2 INCH FOR 24X36 TRANSPARENCIES

      einajlschroeder@gmail.com

  • Genie Padrick

    I would like to know where I can buy 35mm Kodak ready-mounts. I have a lot of film I would like to put into slides. Any ideas?

    • Future Quest Technologies

      please let me know if you still need these – I have a box of 100
      flat and UNSEALED 2X2 INCH FOR 24X36 TRANSPARENCIES

      einajlschroeder@gmail.com

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