Duarte.com/edy

Duarte.com/edy Episode 2: Avoid Clichés

Bob and Finn are back for the latest Duarte.com/edy episode: Avoid Clichés.

If you like what you see, please share with your friends, and be sure to leave a note in the comments. You just might hear back from Bob or Finn in person!

Also, visit www.duarte.com/edy to see all current episodes and sign up to be notified about future ones.

AUTHOR |

Related Posts

  • What’s the difference between something that’s cliche and something that resonates with your audience?

    • I am on a crazy deadline for the next 5 weeks. Crazy. So I will be super s-l-o-w at responding to e-mail.
      If it’s urgent, please contact:
      Drew Fleming for questions about a new project: drew@duarte.com Laura Wall Klieves for questions about training: laura@duarte.com Emily Reginelli for setting up time with me: emily@duarte.com

      Thanks for your patience,

      Nancy

    • Anonymous

      An image that is cliché is typically overused to the point where it either ceases to add meaning or actually makes the audience roll their eyes because they have seen it too many times (not a reaction you want associated with your idea).  An image that resonates with your audience is one that is well thought through and has been selected because it matches the specific nuance of your message and strongly reinforces the point in a unique, specific, memorable way.  Those types of images powerfully communicate your idea to your audience.  Great question, Stiofáin!

      • I ask the question because I once sat in a presentation that was awful and I felt very clichéd. However most of the audience thought it was brilliant. One person’s garbage is another person’s masterpiece. The subjectivity of it all is what makes it so frustrating and intriguing… 

  • What’s the difference between something that’s cliche and something that resonates with your audience?

    • I am on a crazy deadline for the next 5 weeks. Crazy. So I will be super s-l-o-w at responding to e-mail.
      If it’s urgent, please contact:
      Drew Fleming for questions about a new project: drew@duarte.com Laura Wall Klieves for questions about training: laura@duarte.com Emily Reginelli for setting up time with me: emily@duarte.com

      Thanks for your patience,

      Nancy

    • Anonymous

      An image that is cliché is typically overused to the point where it either ceases to add meaning or actually makes the audience roll their eyes because they have seen it too many times (not a reaction you want associated with your idea).  An image that resonates with your audience is one that is well thought through and has been selected because it matches the specific nuance of your message and strongly reinforces the point in a unique, specific, memorable way.  Those types of images powerfully communicate your idea to your audience.  Great question, Stiofáin!

      • I ask the question because I once sat in a presentation that was awful and I felt very clichéd. However most of the audience thought it was brilliant. One person’s garbage is another person’s masterpiece. The subjectivity of it all is what makes it so frustrating and intriguing… 

  • 壬辰年(龙)二月初七 2012-2-28再次造访,暂无所获,http://www.kd010.com

  • 壬辰年(龙)二月初七 2012-2-28再次造访,暂无所获,http://www.kd010.com

  • Haha! Love it. Those are almost as bad as using clip art.

  • Haha! Love it. Those are almost as bad as using clip art.

  • Isn’t using puppets to explain cliches stringing people along?

  • Isn’t using puppets to explain cliches stringing people along?

  • Where’s the bank vault door for when we talk about money? Or the generic business lady using her cell phone for… anything at all mobile? This video is hilarious, and thank you for not making it SOO much longer with all the other cliches out there. PS i have a machine in my office that detects awesome… I unplugged it because it was going off ALL THE TIME.

    • Some people just don’t appreciate awesomeness like we do, Michael. I like the bank vault door idea; I think I’m going to use that on my next presentation!

  • Where’s the bank vault door for when we talk about money? Or the generic business lady using her cell phone for… anything at all mobile? This video is hilarious, and thank you for not making it SOO much longer with all the other cliches out there. PS i have a machine in my office that detects awesome… I unplugged it because it was going off ALL THE TIME.

    • Some people just don’t appreciate awesomeness like we do, Michael. I like the bank vault door idea; I think I’m going to use that on my next presentation!

  • This video
    and comments have got me thinking in a new light about an Ignite talk I’m
    giving next week (http://www.ignitesydney.com/), where I actually advocate the
    use of (possibly) stereotypical images but in specific circumstances.

    To me, it’s
    a matter of choosing the lesser among evils – I advocate using multiple slides
    with (possibly stereotypical) full-bleed photos, where the usual course of
    action is for presenters to display just 1 slide with words, clipart and a
    company logo. Which is better? My money’s on the photos.

    Likewise, I
    even think it’s better to show the dreaded photo of a handshake than it is to
    have a slide full of *text* about partnership. The handshake is better in that it
    leaves the speaker and audience free to make eye contact. Sure, a more original
    photo would be better still, but then having no slide at all might be the *best* option,
    and yet that really doesn’t happen very often!

    For more about
    clichés in visuals, see the comment thread at http://blog.duarte.com/2012/02/want-your-data-to-go-viral-make-it-visual/#disqus_thread

  • This video
    and comments have got me thinking in a new light about an Ignite talk I’m
    giving next week (http://www.ignitesydney.com/), where I actually advocate the
    use of (possibly) stereotypical images but in specific circumstances.

    To me, it’s
    a matter of choosing the lesser among evils – I advocate using multiple slides
    with (possibly stereotypical) full-bleed photos, where the usual course of
    action is for presenters to display just 1 slide with words, clipart and a
    company logo. Which is better? My money’s on the photos.

    Likewise, I
    even think it’s better to show the dreaded photo of a handshake than it is to
    have a slide full of *text* about partnership. The handshake is better in that it
    leaves the speaker and audience free to make eye contact. Sure, a more original
    photo would be better still, but then having no slide at all might be the *best* option,
    and yet that really doesn’t happen very often!

    For more about
    clichés in visuals, see the comment thread at http://blog.duarte.com/2012/02/want-your-data-to-go-viral-make-it-visual/#disqus_thread

  • Mary anne

    My sixth graders finally understand!!

  • Mary anne

    My sixth graders finally understand!!

  • Ian

    I love these shows … VERY well done!! Bravo to those who produces them!

  • Ian

    I love these shows … VERY well done!! Bravo to those who produces them!

  • mona
  • mona
Top