Design

What Do Your Slides Say About You?

Recently, InFocus held a “What Not to Present” contest, looking for the worst PowerPoint slide ever created.  After reviewing tons of horrific submissions, they came up with their top choices, and yep, are they bad.

Your slides are a visual representation of your idea and are a reflection of you.  So, we wondered what kind of people make slides like the ‘winners’ of the InFocus contest.  Mouse over the slides below to see who may be responsible for these gems.

So ask yourself, “What does this slide say about me/my idea?”  If the answer conjures up unpleasant images of pocket protectors or big hair, take another pass at your slides, and remember Duarte’s Golden Rule: Never deliver a presentation you wouldn’t want to sit through.

AUTHOR |

Related Posts

  • I as going to join the Anti-Powerpoint Party (google it) but apparently they like 3D bar charts. This is a tragedy. Most Powerpoint haters cannot make a decent chart; haters of 3D charts can’t make a decent presentation. Most people love bad presentations and bad charts. That’s consistency.

  • I as going to join the Anti-Powerpoint Party (google it) but apparently they like 3D bar charts. This is a tragedy. Most Powerpoint haters cannot make a decent chart; haters of 3D charts can’t make a decent presentation. Most people love bad presentations and bad charts. That’s consistency.

  • I as going to join the Anti-Powerpoint Party (google it) but apparently they like 3D bar charts. This is a tragedy. Most Powerpoint haters cannot make a decent chart; haters of 3D charts can’t make a decent presentation. Most people love bad presentations and bad charts. That’s consistency.

  • You are what you put on a slide!

    Thanks for the Post!

  • You are what you put on a slide!

    Thanks for the Post!

  • You are what you put on a slide!

    Thanks for the Post!

  • Hilarious! The Design for Social Change with the hot dog and bunny has always been one of my favorite bad examples. Thanks for sharing these (and inspiring some laughter).

    Jorge – I agree an affinity for 3D is a tragedy. I recently learned that in addition to creating a lot of visual noise (side panels, strange shadows, etc.), 3D (bars at least) are also plotted really strangely in programs like Excel and PPT – it isn’t the front of the bar OR the back of the bar that’s plotted, but rather the midpoint, making it impossible to actually read the values correctly. Another strike against 3D!

  • Hilarious! The Design for Social Change with the hot dog and bunny has always been one of my favorite bad examples. Thanks for sharing these (and inspiring some laughter).

    Jorge – I agree an affinity for 3D is a tragedy. I recently learned that in addition to creating a lot of visual noise (side panels, strange shadows, etc.), 3D (bars at least) are also plotted really strangely in programs like Excel and PPT – it isn’t the front of the bar OR the back of the bar that’s plotted, but rather the midpoint, making it impossible to actually read the values correctly. Another strike against 3D!

  • Hilarious! The Design for Social Change with the hot dog and bunny has always been one of my favorite bad examples. Thanks for sharing these (and inspiring some laughter).

    Jorge – I agree an affinity for 3D is a tragedy. I recently learned that in addition to creating a lot of visual noise (side panels, strange shadows, etc.), 3D (bars at least) are also plotted really strangely in programs like Excel and PPT – it isn’t the front of the bar OR the back of the bar that’s plotted, but rather the midpoint, making it impossible to actually read the values correctly. Another strike against 3D!

  • Hahahaha!! Love it! Now I’m wondering… how do people see me when they only see my slides? Hmm…

  • Hahahaha!! Love it! Now I’m wondering… how do people see me when they only see my slides? Hmm…

  • Hahahaha!! Love it! Now I’m wondering… how do people see me when they only see my slides? Hmm…

  • When I used to consult in corporations, I collected slides like these for my “PowerPoint Hall of Shame.” Whenever I was feeling blue, I would click through them and instantly feel better. Thanks for sharing!

  • When I used to consult in corporations, I collected slides like these for my “PowerPoint Hall of Shame.” Whenever I was feeling blue, I would click through them and instantly feel better. Thanks for sharing!

  • When I used to consult in corporations, I collected slides like these for my “PowerPoint Hall of Shame.” Whenever I was feeling blue, I would click through them and instantly feel better. Thanks for sharing!

  • Etc

    I have a few I could contribute…. when is the next conmpetition. PowerPoint Oscars.

  • Etc

    I have a few I could contribute…. when is the next conmpetition. PowerPoint Oscars.

  • Etc

    I have a few I could contribute…. when is the next conmpetition. PowerPoint Oscars.

  • Etc

    I have a few I could contribute…. when is the next conmpetition. PowerPoint Oscars.

  • Slides reflect the speaker’s personality, confidence, and preparation. Great post.

  • Slides reflect the speaker’s personality, confidence, and preparation. Great post.

  • Slides reflect the speaker’s personality, confidence, and preparation. Great post.

  • Laura Friesen

    The one on “Core Competencies” looks like one I attended! Great illustrations of what not to do.

  • Laura Friesen

    The one on “Core Competencies” looks like one I attended! Great illustrations of what not to do.

  • Laura Friesen

    The one on “Core Competencies” looks like one I attended! Great illustrations of what not to do.

  • Scott Hodin

    Regarding 3-D, I teach a slide design course at a semiconductor (talk about an uphill battle!) based heavily on best practices from Nancy and Garr.  During the portion of the training where I’m discussing the presentation of data on slides, I have a supporting slide that I created (see attached image) and I go on to talk about how woodgrain or marble textures and 3-D destract from what’s important. This is such an area of struggle for the folks I train, but there is hope!

  • Scott Hodin

    Regarding 3-D, I teach a slide design course at a semiconductor (talk about an uphill battle!) based heavily on best practices from Nancy and Garr.  During the portion of the training where I’m discussing the presentation of data on slides, I have a supporting slide that I created (see attached image) and I go on to talk about how woodgrain or marble textures and 3-D destract from what’s important. This is such an area of struggle for the folks I train, but there is hope!

  • Scott Hodin

    Regarding 3-D, I teach a slide design course at a semiconductor (talk about an uphill battle!) based heavily on best practices from Nancy and Garr.  During the portion of the training where I’m discussing the presentation of data on slides, I have a supporting slide that I created (see attached image) and I go on to talk about how woodgrain or marble textures and 3-D destract from what’s important. This is such an area of struggle for the folks I train, but there is hope!

  • AHH!! My eyes!!
    I think I’ve sat through each of these presentations.
    Yikes.

  • AHH!! My eyes!!
    I think I’ve sat through each of these presentations.
    Yikes.

  • AHH!! My eyes!!
    I think I’ve sat through each of these presentations.
    Yikes.

  • Ann Christin Mahrt

    Great blog!
    Interesting that people don’t see that their PowerPoint presentation is a reflection of themselves.

  • Ann Christin Mahrt

    Great blog!
    Interesting that people don’t see that their PowerPoint presentation is a reflection of themselves.

  • Ann Christin Mahrt

    Great blog!
    Interesting that people don’t see that their PowerPoint presentation is a reflection of themselves.

  • Janet Bornemann

    The funny thing is, the people who created these slides probably thought they were good.
    As designers, our job is to help people differentiate between the bad and the good. Hopefully the more good design they’re exposed to, the more it will start to rub off. Or one would hope, anyway. 

  • Janet Bornemann

    The funny thing is, the people who created these slides probably thought they were good.
    As designers, our job is to help people differentiate between the bad and the good. Hopefully the more good design they’re exposed to, the more it will start to rub off. Or one would hope, anyway. 

  • Janet Bornemann

    The funny thing is, the people who created these slides probably thought they were good.
    As designers, our job is to help people differentiate between the bad and the good. Hopefully the more good design they’re exposed to, the more it will start to rub off. Or one would hope, anyway. 

  • These are some scary slides
    Actually I wouldn’t want to see that type of data even in a report
    They all better use animated Presentations with PowToon
    http://www.powtoon.com 

  • These are some scary slides
    Actually I wouldn’t want to see that type of data even in a report
    They all better use animated Presentations with PowToon
    http://www.powtoon.com 

  • These are some scary slides
    Actually I wouldn’t want to see that type of data even in a report
    They all better use animated Presentations with PowToon
    http://www.powtoon.com 

Top