Business Delivery Design

BNET’s “Ten Big Reasons Why Your Presos Suck!”

A friend of Duarte sent along a link to BNET’s “Ten Big Reasons Why Your Presos Suck!”

It’s silly, but helpful, too. It points out the problem, but also the reason you (probably) did it, analyzes the result, and most importantly, how to fix it.

bigstockphoto_Conference_Meeting_Room1_39589
Photo Courtesy of BNET

The only one I would argue is #8.

It should read:
“Grainy photos, or clip art AT ALL!

Because, really. Why use clip art when there’s this:
http://www.istockphoto.com/

And this:
http://www.shutterstock.com/

And this!
http://www.photolibrary.com/

Do you agree with the list? If not, comment and let us know what makes your presos suck! (And by “your” we mean “everyone else’s”.)

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  • Thanks for the pointers to the stock photo sites. I’ve been using BigStockPhoto.com for the blog and am very happy with it.

    Like the “presos” terminology. Funny!

  • Thanks for the pointers to the stock photo sites. I’ve been using BigStockPhoto.com for the blog and am very happy with it.

    Like the “presos” terminology. Funny!

  • Aude

    I quite agree with this list! And I’m thinking of another reason (which could go with the #4 actually):
    “You presented as if the audience knew exactly what you were talking about, from the very beginning”.
    To me it’s clearly a lack; very few people take the time to step back from their project, especially when it’s very technical. Like this, I think the audience is lost after 3 slides…

  • Aude

    I quite agree with this list! And I’m thinking of another reason (which could go with the #4 actually):
    “You presented as if the audience knew exactly what you were talking about, from the very beginning”.
    To me it’s clearly a lack; very few people take the time to step back from their project, especially when it’s very technical. Like this, I think the audience is lost after 3 slides…

  • Bruce Couch

    I agree with the list but the site showing the “Ten Big Reasons Why Your Presos Suck!” needs to layout the article so it doesn’t visually suck. or were they trying to be ironic? :c)

  • Bruce Couch

    I agree with the list but the site showing the “Ten Big Reasons Why Your Presos Suck!” needs to layout the article so it doesn’t visually suck. or were they trying to be ironic? :c)

  • Geoffrey: thanks for the recommendation! I hadn’t heard of that site before. Just checked it out, and it looks like there’s some good CHEAP images!

    Aude: great point. A little homework on your audience goes a looong way.

    Bruce: I know, right??

  • Geoffrey: thanks for the recommendation! I hadn’t heard of that site before. Just checked it out, and it looks like there’s some good CHEAP images!

    Aude: great point. A little homework on your audience goes a looong way.

    Bruce: I know, right??

  • bill

    i’m with bruce. ironic that the article layout on the site SUCKS. damn popups at every click?

  • bill

    i’m with bruce. ironic that the article layout on the site SUCKS. damn popups at every click?

  • I’ve also found Flickr to be more and more useful for stock photography (with photo credits). Many of the images on iStock tend to be less artsy and more staged. It’s a little tougher to search through Flickr but the extra effort just might pay off.

    I also agree with the site layout – incredibly confusing and it’s aggravating to have to click 10 times to get through the blog post.

  • I’ve also found Flickr to be more and more useful for stock photography (with photo credits). Many of the images on iStock tend to be less artsy and more staged. It’s a little tougher to search through Flickr but the extra effort just might pay off.

    I also agree with the site layout – incredibly confusing and it’s aggravating to have to click 10 times to get through the blog post.

  • This illustrates what I teach my clients regularly at Performance Power Media: know your audience, target and focus the material, and practice, practice, practice! On camera!
    Vickie Jenkins

  • This illustrates what I teach my clients regularly at Performance Power Media: know your audience, target and focus the material, and practice, practice, practice! On camera!
    Vickie Jenkins

  • The problem with the stock photography sites can be that some of the photos are so over-used that they have become clichéd. It’s worth searching for less-used shots, or indeed, looking elsewhere.

  • The problem with the stock photography sites can be that some of the photos are so over-used that they have become clichéd. It’s worth searching for less-used shots, or indeed, looking elsewhere.

  • Thanks for this (and your blog in general – I’ve found it very helpful). I agree with lots of BNET’s suggestions.

    If you think presentations are bad in the sphere of business – try working with academics! I made my own list of presentation offences after coming home in a furore from a particularly shocking academic conference (you can find them archived here). There’s a lot of cross-over with the BNET list, but a few things that academics (at least Australian ones) are really bad at are trying to sneak in extra content by loading slides with vast quantities of text and failing to demonstrate why their research is relevant.

  • Thanks for this (and your blog in general – I’ve found it very helpful). I agree with lots of BNET’s suggestions.

    If you think presentations are bad in the sphere of business – try working with academics! I made my own list of presentation offences after coming home in a furore from a particularly shocking academic conference (you can find them archived here). There’s a lot of cross-over with the BNET list, but a few things that academics (at least Australian ones) are really bad at are trying to sneak in extra content by loading slides with vast quantities of text and failing to demonstrate why their research is relevant.

  • LittleFish

    Great blog, Nancy. I was gratified to be credited on bnet’s revised blog post; but a little offended my original post was altered. Here’s my original post from the first bnet blog:

    “While I agree that one shouldn’t use tacky visuals (NEVER use clipart! Cheesy!), less text and more professional photos are usually a good idea (if they support the context of the slide). Move your text to the notes pane and use as a script of sorts.

    Be sure photos are professional and simple composition, though, and high enough resolution to project without pixilating. Stock photography is finally affordable, so no excuses for stealing images from the web (they’re usually too small to project anyway).

    I once knew a man who put a picture of his daughter in every presentation, whether it jibed w/the message or not. Message is cutting costs w/a picture of a kid w/chocolate ice cream all over its face. Hmmmm. Save it for the family reunion.”

  • LittleFish

    Great blog, Nancy. I was gratified to be credited on bnet’s revised blog post; but a little offended my original post was altered. Here’s my original post from the first bnet blog:

    “While I agree that one shouldn’t use tacky visuals (NEVER use clipart! Cheesy!), less text and more professional photos are usually a good idea (if they support the context of the slide). Move your text to the notes pane and use as a script of sorts.

    Be sure photos are professional and simple composition, though, and high enough resolution to project without pixilating. Stock photography is finally affordable, so no excuses for stealing images from the web (they’re usually too small to project anyway).

    I once knew a man who put a picture of his daughter in every presentation, whether it jibed w/the message or not. Message is cutting costs w/a picture of a kid w/chocolate ice cream all over its face. Hmmmm. Save it for the family reunion.”

  • Good Duarte post, and good BNET post.

    I don’t know if I completely agree with # 3. Of course you should avoid *weak* attempts at being funny. But, there’s nothing wrong with being funny or having fun with a presentation if you’re authentic. If you’re naturally funny, use that to your advantage. You don’t need to be a professional comedian to make your audience laugh and enjoy the presentation. Look at Chris Brogan or Gary Vaynerchuk.

    That said, don’t force the funny if it doesn’t come naturally…!!!

  • Good Duarte post, and good BNET post.

    I don’t know if I completely agree with # 3. Of course you should avoid *weak* attempts at being funny. But, there’s nothing wrong with being funny or having fun with a presentation if you’re authentic. If you’re naturally funny, use that to your advantage. You don’t need to be a professional comedian to make your audience laugh and enjoy the presentation. Look at Chris Brogan or Gary Vaynerchuk.

    That said, don’t force the funny if it doesn’t come naturally…!!!

  • Thanks.. for a great share

  • Thanks.. for a great share

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