When you give a presentation, you know it backwards, forwards, sideways, and upside down. You could give this talk if you were half-asleep while driving a car and juggling knives.

Youre a smooth talker, plain and simple. You can speak off-the-cuff about pretty much anything. And you haven’t riddled your talk with “like”s and “um”s since you were in college.

You’re not an arrogant jerk about it, but when you think of giving a presentation, you think, “No sweat. I know my material cold, and I’m the exact right person to be giving this.”

The first 90 seconds of your presentation make your audience think, “This speaker gets me. I think they really understand what’s going on with me.”

If you were asked to describe the top three things the people in your audience need, you could list them off without stopping to think. In fact, you were thinking about them before we even asked.

You design your presentations to help your audience. Youre not up there for you; youre up there for them.

Your presentation has at least one moment that everybody (except that grump in the fourth row) will be talking about afterwards.

You vary the pitch, pace, and projection of your voice throughout your presentation. No one ever accuses you of being monotone or soft-spoken. Instead, you work your voice like Eric Clapton works a guitar.

Your presentation uses a variety of elements (stories! data! quotes!) and emotions (excitement! happiness! fear! regret!) to keep your audience engaged.

You’re more excited when someone tells you after a presentation, “Hey, that was really helpful for me,” than when they say, “Hey, you’re a great presenter.”


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