​Once you have a draft presentation that you’re satisfied with, it’s time for another critique. Don’t wait until your draft is polished and perfect. Accept that the rough draft of nearly anything is just that—rough.

​By putting an early draft in front of your colleagues, you can get feedback earlier, which will help you stay focused and avoid rabbit trails. 

​Their input can also help you jump difficult hurdles, like an awkward transition, a particularly difficult concept to explain, or a dull headline.

Presentations are perfect for group editing because you can lay them out in an open area and the group can gather around and discuss various ideas and improvements.

​With each presentation slide as an individual topic, you can easily alter the structure by moving slides around. If you were to post a document of prose on the wall, there would be multiple points per page.

​Subjecting yourself to peer review can be painful, but it offers great rewards. Embracing other perspectives of your work helps it reach a broader audience, and helps you grow into a stronger communicator.

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